10 Ways to Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

How to Lower Blood Sugar Levels

 

High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, is something that many people living with diabetes or non-diabetics face regularly. You may feel nauseous, lethargic, and irritable and find yourself extremely thirsty and having to go to the bathroom constantly.

Symptoms of high blood sugar can sometimes feel similar to symptoms of hypoglycemia or very low blood sugar; therefore, it's critical to check your blood sugar before you take action. The Mayo Clinic tells us that a normal fasting blood glucose target range for people without diabetes is 70 to 100 mg/dL (3.9-5.6 mmol/L). [1]Diabetes – Diagnosis and treatment – Mayo Clinic. (2022, August 9).  . Retrieved September 11, 2022, from … Continue reading

The American Diabetes Association suggests that a fasting plasma glucose level for those with diabetes be 70 to 130 mg/dL (3.9-7.2 mmol/L) and, after meals, less than 180 mg/dL (10 mmol/L). Test your blood sugar to see whether your levels are within these ranges, and then treat accordingly.

A host of factors influences your blood sugar. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM, says that “Your blood sugars are affected by a large number of things, including what you ate (especially refined ‘white' carbohydrates), how long ago you ate, your starting blood glucose level, physical activity, mental stress, illness, sleep patterns, and more.” [2]Colberg, S. R. PhD, FACSM (2012, February 22). What You Can Do to Stop the Blood Sugar Rollercoaster. Diabetes in Control. Retrieved August 15, 2022, from … Continue reading

Because all of these influencers affect your blood sugar levels, there are many natural ways to lower them. In addition, there are many lifestyle habits that can keep them consistently low.

How to Lower Your Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

Here are some tried-and-true tips and tricks for lowering your blood sugar —backed by research — that can be used in tandem with your diabetes medication.

1. Exercise When You Start Feeling High

When the symptoms arise, or you've checked your blood sugar and seen that your levels are high, exercise can be a fast and natural way to lower your blood sugar instead of using insulin or other glucose-lowering medications.

The endorphins released by your brain and nervous system when you exercise also help you to start feeling better. Engaging in physical activity increases your body's sensitivity to insulin and makes your muscles take in more glucose, so less is left circulating in the bloodstream. Exercise also prompts the heart to beat and the blood to flow faster, using the glucose in your system with enhanced speed.

“An exercise session helps your body metabolize glucose by getting it out of your blood and into your muscles without insulin,” Dr. Sheri Colberg explained to Perfscience.

It's no secret that exercise will help lower blood glucose naturally, which will reverse or erase the effects of overeating carbohydrates or insulin resistance. The regular motion of your body increases your muscles' sensitivity to insulin. Therefore, it will take less time to accomplish the same task whether your body makes it or if you pump it or inject it.

Those claims were supported by a study presented at the 54th annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine. The research concluded that 20 minutes of vigorous exercise four times a week or 30 minutes of moderate exercise three times a week can lower fasting blood sugar levels. [3]Lower Blood Sugar: Learn How with Diabetes Nutritional Supplements & Natural Diabetes Treatments. (n.d.). Retrieved August 16, 2022, from … Continue reading

Therefore, according to this research, regular exercise — not just one-time instances — can improve blood sugar levels overall.

There are precautions to take when working out with high blood sugar, however. Check for ketones in your urine if you have type 1 diabetes and your glucose is 250 mg/dL or above.

If ketones are present, you should refrain from exercising, advised Christy Parkin, MSN, RD, CDE, on Diabetes Forecast. Also, check your blood sugar as you exercise to ensure it doesn't get too low.

2. Stress Less

There is substantial evidence that stress is a critical factor in the increase of blood glucose levels for most people over the long term, according to William Polonsky, Ph.D., CDE, director of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute in San Diego.

But why?

When you relax, your body releases chemicals that lower your blood sugar. Conversely, when you're stressed, your body releases hormones that make your blood sugar spike.

A body under stress releases glucose-raising hormones like adrenaline and cortisol because it activates the fight-or-flight mode we use for survival. When you are mentally stressed, angry, or upset, your body may release more cortisol into the bloodstream, which makes your muscles more insulin-resistant.

When you are physically under stress, such as after surgery or because of an injury or illness, you may also experience rises in blood sugar.

In those with type 2 diabetes, mental and physical stress often causes high blood sugar levels. But in those with type 1 diabetes, physical stress usually raises blood sugar, but mental stress can sometimes lower it.

According to the American Diabetes Association in Diabetes Journals, stress makes stored energy — fat and glucose — available to the cells. [4]Surwit, R. S., Schneider, M. S., & Feinglos, M. N. (1992, October 1). Stress and Diabetes Mellitus. American Diabetes Association. Retrieved August 12, 2022, from … Continue reading But in those with diabetes, insulin doesn't always work well and doesn't allow the extra energy into the cells, causing glucose to accumulate in the bloodstream.

In order to reduce controllable stress in your life, learn breathing exercises, meditation, or yoga, or participate in enjoyable, stress-relieving hobbies like reading, playing an instrument, or hiking.

3. Drink Water

Water helps your body flush glucose out of your system and stabilize sugars in the bloodstream. This is such a simple, intuitive action, but many of us need to ingest more water than we do now. The more you drink when you are experiencing high blood sugar, the better. Drink at least two glasses of water, one right after the other.

Many Americans think they are getting enough liquids in the day because they consume sodas (soft drinks), sports drinks, energy drinks, fruit drinks, iced tea, and more. But we forget how many added sugars are in these beverages. American adults consume an average of 22 teaspoons of added sugar a day, with the biggest contributor being soft drinks, which make up one-third of our daily sugar intake.

The American Heart Association recommends no more than 9.5 teaspoons of sugar a day. Forbes also tells us that one 12-ounce can of our beloved Coke has 10 teaspoons of sugar, which is more than two frosted Pop Tarts and a Twinkie combined. [5]Walton, A. G. (2012, August 30). How Much Sugar Are Americans Eating? [Infographic]. Forbes. Retrieved August 15, 2022, from … Continue reading The average American also drinks 53 gallons of soft drinks a year. This is absolutely astounding data!

Don't reverse the beneficial effects of water on your blood sugar by consuming all the sugar found in soft drinks, which will only raise your blood sugar higher.

Being dehydrated can also have adverse consequences on blood sugar levels. A 2011 study published in Diabetes Care pinpointed a hormone called vasopressin that helps regulate water retention and can also affect blood sugar. [6]Roussel, R., Fezeu, L., Bouby, N., Balkau, B., Lantieri, O., Alhenc-Gelas, F., Marre, M., & Bankir, L. (2011, November 14). Low Water Intake and Risk for New-Onset Hyperglycemia. Diabetes … Continue reading

When the body is dehydrated, vasopressin levels rise, causing the kidneys to hold onto water. Simultaneously, the New York Times reported that vasopressin stimulates blood sugar from the liver, which can affect the body's ability to produce or respond to insulin.

Researchers in this study observed over 3,000 middle-aged men and women for nine years, with all participants showing normal blood sugar readings at the beginning of observation.

After nine years, more than 500 had developed high blood sugar, which is a major indicator of pre-diabetes, and more than 200 had developed type 2 diabetes. But, those who drank 17 to 34 ounces of water a day had about a 30 percent lower risk of high blood sugar or diabetes than those who drank less.

There has been much discussion in the scientific community regarding hyperglycemia and the subsequent onset of diabetes, both of which can be prevented or delayed when a diabetic increases their water intake [W-intake].

4. Laugh More

Negative emotions such as anxiety, fear, and sorrow can raise blood glucose levels. On the other hand, positive emotions like gratitude and wholesome behaviors like laughter may positively affect blood sugar.

A 2003 study conducted in Japan observed the behaviors and glucose levels of 19 patients with type 2 diabetes who were not on insulin therapy and 5 healthy participants over two days. [7]Hayashi, K., Hayashi, T., Iwanaga, S., Kawai, K., Ishii, H., Shoji, S., & Murakami, K. (2003, May 1). Laughter Lowered the Increase in Postprandial Blood Glucose. Diabetes Care, 26(5), … Continue reading

The participants attended a monotonous, humorless lecture for 40 minutes on the first day. On the second day, volunteers participated in a comedy show for 40 minutes.

Researchers discovered that the diabetics' blood sugar was more stable after they laughed. Laughter, they concluded, may suppress the rise in blood sugars in patients with diabetes, possibly through an action in the neuroendocrine system.

They concluded that, according to their findings, “diabetic patients typically need to have opportunities to laugh every day in order to alleviate their symptoms.”

Laughing could also lead to other health and mental benefits like sparking thinking, allowing for greater adaptation to circumstances, and prompting creativity. One study out of Johns Hopkins Medical School even found that laughter during class helped students get better grades on tests. [8]Laughter really is the best medicine — Lower blood sugar, ease pain and boost health with a daily dose of mirth. (n.d.). NaturalNews. Retrieved August 16, 2022, from … Continue reading

So laugh a little more, and stop taking life so seriously.

5. Eat Protein-Packed Food

Protein can be a very effective blood stabilizer because it slows the absorption rate of glucose. Protein also keeps your stomach feeling full longer, whereas foods high in sugar are quickly digested and do not satiate you for very long.

High blood sugar can also spark hunger; therefore, a protein-filled snack can lower blood sugar and satisfy cravings at the same time.

Interestingly, a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that eating a high-protein diet postprandially reduced blood glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes and improved overall glucose control as well. [9]Gannon, M. C., Nuttall, F. Q., Saeed, A., Jordan, K., & Hoover, H. (2003, October 1). An increase in dietary protein improves the blood glucose response in persons with type 2 diabetes. The … Continue reading

In a study by the National Institutes of Health, protein does not seem to raise blood glucose levels for a number of reasons, including the slow conversion of protein to glucose, the lower rate of protein conversion to glucose and release than previously thought, the hepatic glycogen stores are incorporated with protein glucose. Still, the rate of hepatic glucose release does not increase. [10]Franz, M. J. (1997, December). Protein: Metabolism and Effect on Blood Glucose Levels. The Diabetes Educator23(6), 643–651. https://doi.org/10.1177/014572179702300603

Examples of healthy proteins to reduce high blood sugar include turkey lunchmeat, yogurt without added sugar, or an ounce of cheese. Ask your diabetes healthcare professional, such as your CDE or dietitian, for small protein snacks they recommend to lower blood sugar.

6. Avoid Over-Treating Your Lows

If you have diabetes, and especially if you use insulin or some oral medications, you will most likely experience a low blood sugar reaction called hypoglycemia now and then.

It would be best if you treated these lows effectively without over-treating them. Over-treating can lead to high blood sugar, putting you on the blood sugar rollercoaster.

Proper treatment can be easier said than done, as it may be difficult to control what and how much you're eating when you're low.

Plan ahead for hypoglycemia with a set amount of carbohydrates to raise your blood sugar levels, like glucose tablets, hard candies, 1 tablespoon of honey, 2 tablespoons of raisins, or ½ cup of juice or non-diet soda.

According to the American Diabetes Association, you should consume 15 to 20 grams of glucose or simple carbs when you are experiencing hypoglycemia. [11]Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Glucose) | ADA. (n.d.). Retrieved August 15, 2022, from https://diabetes.org/healthy-living/medication-treatments/blood-glucose-testing-and-control/hypoglycemia You should check your blood glucose 15 minutes later to ensure it is within the normal range, 70 mg/dL or higher. Follow the first step again if your blood sugar is still low. When your blood sugar returns to normal, eat a snack if your next planned meal is more than an hour away.

Not only is overcompensating for lows with too much sugar and rebounding to a high bad for your blood glucose, but it can also make you gain weight.

7. Sleep More

The amount of sleep you get affects the release of glucagon and insulin, hormones that regulate your blood sugar levels. Blood glucose increases with the secretion of glucagon and decreases with the secretion of insulin.

As long as you get enough sleep, your body can maintain healthy blood sugar levels during the day. Therefore, sleep deprivation can severely affect blood sugar regulation. The National Institutes of Health says, “Chronic sleep loss, behavioral or sleep disorder related, may represent a novel risk factor for weight gain, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes.” [12]Spiegel, K., Knutson, K., Leproult, R., Tasali, E., & Cauter, E. V. (2005, November). Sleep loss: a novel risk factor for insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Journal of Applied … Continue reading

“Numerous studies suggest that not getting enough sleep and/or having interrupted sleep may worsen control of diabetes and increase overeating,” said Carol Touma, MD, an endocrinologist at the University of Chicago.

A study conducted between 1996 and 2003 found that people who sleep less than six hours a night have a higher risk of “developing impaired fasting glucose,” according to the study's press release [13]“Short-sleepers” may develop blood sugar abnormality that can lead to diabetes. (n.d.). EurekAlert! Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/609540. Damaged fasting glucose levels are a telltale sign of pre-diabetes and a precursor to type 2 diabetes.

Researchers discovered that participants who had normal fasting glucose and slept an average of less than six hours a night during the work week were 4.56 times more likely to have impaired fasting glucose after six years of observation than those getting six to eight hours a night.

Sleep deprivation may also increase free fatty acids in healthy individuals. This inhibits insulin from regulating blood sugar levels and, in turn, can lead to type 2 diabetes, according to another study published in the Biomedcentral. [14]Briançon-Marjollet, A., Weiszenstein, M., Henri, M., Thomas, A., Godin-Ribuot, D., & Polak, J. (2015, March 24). The impact of sleep disorders on glucose metabolism: endocrine and molecular … Continue reading

Just a few nights of poor sleep increased the level of fatty acids in the blood of healthy young men by 15 to 30 percent. When fatty acids stay high, the body's ability to use insulin to regulate blood sugar is impaired.

“The result was a significant loss of insulin's beneficial effects. Consequently, this crucial hormone was less effective,” explained Josiane Broussard, Ph.D., the study's primary author. “Insulin action in these healthy young men resembled what we typically see in early stages of diabetes.”

8. Exercise Before You Eat

Recent research suggests that 20 to 30 minutes of exercise before a meal can help prevent post-dinner blood sugars from rising. A study published in the July 2014 issue of Diabetologia found that “exercise snacks” before main meals may help improve glycemic control in people with insulin resistance. [15]Francois, M. E., Baldi, J. C., Manning, P. J., Lucas, S. J. E., Hawley, J. A., Williams, M. J. A., & Cotter, J. D. (2014, May 10). ‘Exercise snacks’ before meals: a novel strategy to improve … Continue reading

Individuals with insulin resistance can improve glycemic control by doing brief, intense exercise sessions before main meals.

So can you squeeze these exercise times into your daily schedule? We suggest taking your dog for a walk or jogging around the block for 20 minutes. We also suggests taking the stairs at work or while running errands.

You can also lift weights or do crunches or push-ups during the commercials when your favorite TV show is on. Walking or riding your bike to work is another great suggestion.

These behaviors will not only help improve your blood sugar control but can benefit your overall health, including heart health and weight control.

9. Eat Fewer Processed Foods, More Healthy Foods

Your body breaks down white grain and sugar products very fast. You need foods that digest slowly and are full of nutrients your body needs. When your blood sugars are high, stay away from processed foods.

“Anything refined (including foods or drinks made with white sugar, white flour, white rice, white potatoes, etc.) causes big spikes in your blood sugars and can contribute to the blood sugar rollercoaster. They are best avoided or eaten in limited quantities,” Dr. Colberg recommends.

Eat Certain Vegetables

Garlic and onions can help stabilize blood sugars because they contain a chemical that stimulates the pancreas to produce insulin, which ultimately lowers blood sugar.

Okra, a green vegetable with edible seeds and is common in Southern cuisine, is full of viscous fiber that absorbs water in the digestive tract and forms a thick jelly-like mass. This mass slows the rate of the breakdown of food and the rate at which glucose in the bloodstream is absorbed, according to Amy Reeder, MS, RD, CDE.

Other non-starchy vegetables, like green beans, broccoli, kale, and spinach, are low in carbs and high in fiber and other essential vitamins and minerals. These vegetables, like potatoes, peas, and corn, also make you feel full longer than their starchy counterparts.

Consume Vinegar Products

Vinegar, such as the commonly used apple cider vinegar, may slow down the rise in blood sugar after meals. The research of Carol Johnston, professor of nutrition at Arizona State University's east campus, has found that two tablespoons of vinegar before a meal, perhaps as part of a vinaigrette added to an appetizer salad, can dramatically reduce surges in blood glucose after a meal.

In her first study on vinegar, Johnston and her team observed 29 volunteers, with one-third of them living with type 2 diabetes and two-thirds healthy individuals.

Her team gave each participant a two-tablespoon vinegar dose or a placebo before eating a high-carb breakfast of orange juice, bagel, and butter. A few days later, they switched who got the placebo and vinegar and gave them the same breakfast.

All of the participants showed better blood sugar readings after meals when they had the dose of vinegar before eating. Johnston claims that the tests showed an effect comparable to diabetes drugs like metformin, especially for subjects with pre-diabetes.

Vinegar can also spark weight loss or curb weight gain, according to another of Johnston's trials.

In a 2001 study conducted at Lund University in Sweden, pickles – cucumbers preserved in vinegar – were found to have a positive impact on lowering blood sugar levels in non-diabetics after a meal.

Their study shows that pickles reduced blood sugar swell significantly after high-carb breakfasts, but regular cucumbers didn't.

Since most people don't like drinking straight vinegar, consider using more vinaigrettes in your salads, eating more pickles or other high-vinegar foods, and incorporating more vinegar into your cooking to help steady blood sugar levels.

10. Take Diabetes Supplements

Supplements can be an excellent, natural way to provide your body with the extra nutrients it needs to balance blood glucose levels successfully.

There are several supplements that are suggested to help regulate blood sugars, and you should discuss them with your healthcare provider before implementing any into your diabetes treatment plan.

Research around diabetes supplements is somewhat limited and/or of questionable quality, so you should proceed with your doctor's advice and with your own caution.

Onion Extract

Onion extract may be a helpful supplement to take. One study presented at the Endocrine Society's 97th annual meeting in March 2015 found that onion extract may lower high blood sugar by 50% while also lowering total cholesterol levels. [16]Onion Extract Lowers High Blood Sugar Up to 50%. (2015, March 13). Diabetes in Control. Retrieved August 15, 2022, from … Continue reading

Researchers also found that onion extract enhanced the effects of metformin. Lead researcher Anthony Ojieh, MD, of Delta State University in Nigeria, added that “Onion is cheap and available.”

Chromium

Chromium is another supplement in the spotlight. A 2006 study found that nutrient therapy with 2 mg of biotin (part of the B-group vitamins) and 600 mcg of chromium (a trace mineral) can significantly reduce blood sugar levels and blood fats called triglycerides in type 2 diabetics in just four weeks. The benefits came even after volunteers drank a glucose-rich liquid. [17]Singer, G. M., & Geohas, J. (2006, December). The Effect of Chromium Picolinate and Biotin Supplementation on Glycemic Control in Poorly Controlled Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A … Continue reading

In a 2008 study, the same therapy was given for 90 days to 447 participants living with type 2 diabetes [18]Albarracin, C. A., Fuqua, B. C., Evans, J. L., & Goldfine, I. D. (2007). Chromium picolinate and biotin combination improves glucose metabolism in treated, uncontrolled overweight to obese … Continue reading. They found that treatment with chromium and biotin reduced HbA1c levels by 0.54 percent — meaning if someone had an HbA1c level of 7.54 percent, it was reduced to 7 percent. High blood sugar levels also fell significantly, especially for those volunteers who were overweight or obese.

Cinnamon

Cinnamon is also a popular supplement to help control blood sugar. A 2009 study found that 500 mg capsules of cinnamon taken twice a day for 90 days improved HbA1c levels in people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes [19]Diabetes treatment: Can cinnamon lower blood sugar? (2021, March 19). Mayo Clinic. Retrieved August 16, 2022, from … Continue reading. This may be because cinnamon increases insulin action.

Cinnamon may reduce blood sugar by three to five percent, about the level of reduction found in the older generation of diabetes medications, according to Paul Davis, Ph.D., a research nutritionist with the University of California, Davis, who conducted a meta-analysis on cinnamon studies. [20]Davis, P. A., & Yokoyama, W. (2011, September). Cinnamon Intake Lowers Fasting Blood Glucose: Meta-Analysis. Journal of Medicinal Food14(9), 884–889. https://doi.org/10.1089/jmf.2010.0180

Cinnamon should by no means replace diabetes medication. Still, it might help decrease blood sugar levels, and the chance of developing type 2 diabetes for pre-diabetics, Emmy Suhl of Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston told National Public Radio (NPR) [21]Aubrey, A. (2013, December 30). Cinnamon Can Help Lower Blood Sugar, But One Variety May Be Best. NPR.Org. Retrieved August 16, 2022, from … Continue reading.

Cinnamon is tasty and inexpensive, but the most common form we find in our local grocery stores, called cassia, may have high levels of coumarin. This naturally occurring ingredient can cause liver toxicity in some individuals prone to it who eat large amounts.

Because of this possibility, albeit rare, some health experts suggest using Ceylon cinnamon instead. Cinnamon capsules for supplements are another great option instead of incorporating cinnamon into your food.

Other Supplements

The mulberry extract may also be another helpful supplement to regulate blood sugar [22]Mudra, M., Ercan-Fang, N., Zhong, L., Furne, J., & Levitt, M. (2007, May 1). Influence of Mulberry Leaf Extract on the Blood Glucose and Breath Hydrogen Response to Ingestion of 75 g Sucrose by … Continue reading. In many parts of Asia, type 2 diabetes is treated with mulberries.

Some research suggests that bitter melon, magnesium, prickly pear cactus, alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), green tea, and fenugreek are among other supplements that may help blood sugar levels.

Bottom Line

There are many different ways to lower your blood sugar levels naturally. You don't have to make drastic changes to your diet or exercise routine.

Many of them include making lifestyle modifications, such as maintaining healthy body weight, reducing stress levels, sleeping well, getting enough rest, eating balanced meals, and drinking plenty of water. These are important steps because they help reduce your risk of developing complications related to high blood glucose levels.

However, there are other factors that play a role too. For example, certain foods can affect how quickly your blood sugar rises after you eat. Some people might benefit from taking nutritional supplements, while others could use medication. This is why it's important to work closely with your doctor. They can recommend the best approach for you.

References

References
1 Diabetes – Diagnosis and treatment – Mayo Clinic. (2022, August 9).  . Retrieved September 11, 2022, from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20371451
2 Colberg, S. R. PhD, FACSM (2012, February 22). What You Can Do to Stop the Blood Sugar Rollercoaster. Diabetes in Control. Retrieved August 15, 2022, from https://www.diabetesincontrol.com/what-you-can-do-to-stop-the-blood-sugar-rollercoaster/
3 Lower Blood Sugar: Learn How with Diabetes Nutritional Supplements & Natural Diabetes Treatments. (n.d.). Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://www.diabeticcareservices.com/diabetes-education/lower-your-blood-sugar
4 Surwit, R. S., Schneider, M. S., & Feinglos, M. N. (1992, October 1). Stress and Diabetes Mellitus. American Diabetes Association. Retrieved August 12, 2022, from https://diabetesjournals.org/care/article/15/10/1413/18492/Stress-and-Diabetes-Mellitus
5 Walton, A. G. (2012, August 30). How Much Sugar Are Americans Eating? [Infographic]. Forbes. Retrieved August 15, 2022, from https://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2012/08/30/how-much-sugar-are-americans-eating-infographic/?sh=5ca5dc34ee74
6 Roussel, R., Fezeu, L., Bouby, N., Balkau, B., Lantieri, O., Alhenc-Gelas, F., Marre, M., & Bankir, L. (2011, November 14). Low Water Intake and Risk for New-Onset Hyperglycemia. Diabetes Care34(12), 2551–2554. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc11-0652
7 Hayashi, K., Hayashi, T., Iwanaga, S., Kawai, K., Ishii, H., Shoji, S., & Murakami, K. (2003, May 1). Laughter Lowered the Increase in Postprandial Blood Glucose. Diabetes Care26(5), 1651–1652. https://doi.org/10.2337/diacare.26.5.1651
8 Laughter really is the best medicine — Lower blood sugar, ease pain and boost health with a daily dose of mirth. (n.d.). NaturalNews. Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://www.naturalnews.com/037669_laughter_medicine_blood_sugar.html
9 Gannon, M. C., Nuttall, F. Q., Saeed, A., Jordan, K., & Hoover, H. (2003, October 1). An increase in dietary protein improves the blood glucose response in persons with type 2 diabetes. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition78(4), 734–741. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/78.4.734
10 Franz, M. J. (1997, December). Protein: Metabolism and Effect on Blood Glucose Levels. The Diabetes Educator23(6), 643–651. https://doi.org/10.1177/014572179702300603
11 Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Glucose) | ADA. (n.d.). Retrieved August 15, 2022, from https://diabetes.org/healthy-living/medication-treatments/blood-glucose-testing-and-control/hypoglycemia
12 Spiegel, K., Knutson, K., Leproult, R., Tasali, E., & Cauter, E. V. (2005, November). Sleep loss: a novel risk factor for insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Journal of Applied Physiology99(5), 2008–2019. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00660.2005
13 “Short-sleepers” may develop blood sugar abnormality that can lead to diabetes. (n.d.). EurekAlert! Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/609540
14 Briançon-Marjollet, A., Weiszenstein, M., Henri, M., Thomas, A., Godin-Ribuot, D., & Polak, J. (2015, March 24). The impact of sleep disorders on glucose metabolism: endocrine and molecular mechanisms. Diabetology &Amp; Metabolic Syndrome7(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13098-015-0018-3
15 Francois, M. E., Baldi, J. C., Manning, P. J., Lucas, S. J. E., Hawley, J. A., Williams, M. J. A., & Cotter, J. D. (2014, May 10). ‘Exercise snacks’ before meals: a novel strategy to improve glycaemic control in individuals with insulin resistance. Diabetologia57(7), 1437–1445. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-014-3244-6
16 Onion Extract Lowers High Blood Sugar Up to 50%. (2015, March 13). Diabetes in Control. Retrieved August 15, 2022, from https://www.diabetesincontrol.com/onion-extract-lowers-high-blood-sugar-up-to-50/
17 Singer, G. M., & Geohas, J. (2006, December). The Effect of Chromium Picolinate and Biotin Supplementation on Glycemic Control in Poorly Controlled Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded, Randomized Trial. Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics8(6), 636–643. https://doi.org/10.1089/dia.2006.8.636
18 Albarracin, C. A., Fuqua, B. C., Evans, J. L., & Goldfine, I. D. (2007). Chromium picolinate and biotin combination improves glucose metabolism in treated, uncontrolled overweight to obese patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, 24(1), 41–51. https://doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.755
19 Diabetes treatment: Can cinnamon lower blood sugar? (2021, March 19). Mayo Clinic. Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/expert-answers/diabetes/faq-20058472
20 Davis, P. A., & Yokoyama, W. (2011, September). Cinnamon Intake Lowers Fasting Blood Glucose: Meta-Analysis. Journal of Medicinal Food14(9), 884–889. https://doi.org/10.1089/jmf.2010.0180
21 Aubrey, A. (2013, December 30). Cinnamon Can Help Lower Blood Sugar, But One Variety May Be Best. NPR.Org. Retrieved August 16, 2022, from https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2013/12/30/255778250/cinnamon-can-help-lower-blood-sugar-but-one-variety-may-be-best
22 Mudra, M., Ercan-Fang, N., Zhong, L., Furne, J., & Levitt, M. (2007, May 1). Influence of Mulberry Leaf Extract on the Blood Glucose and Breath Hydrogen Response to Ingestion of 75 g Sucrose by Type 2 Diabetic and Control Subjects. Diabetes Care, 30(5), 1272–1274. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc06-2120
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