Research

Tennessee lawmaker seeks ban on use of food stamps for buying junk food

Tennessee lawmaker seeks ban on use of food stamps for buying junk food

A Tennessee lawmaker has proposed a new bill that aims to prevent people from using food stamps to purchase items that have no nutritional value, such as soda, candy and ice cream.

Rep. Sheila Butt, a Republican from Columbia, said her measure HB 43 would prohibit individuals from using food stamps to buy items are high in calories, sugar or fat, and have low nutritional value.

Under the proposed measure, state officials would be able to seek a waiver to produce a list of food items that would be prohibited due to their low nutritional value.

Tags: 

British climate scientists raise concerns over Trump presidency

British climate scientists raise concerns over Trump presidency

British climate scientists have urged Prime Minister Theresa May to press U.S. President-elect Donald Trump to acknowledge risks being posed by climate change and support international efforts to tackle global warming.

In a letter written to Mrs. May on Monday, a group of 100 climate scientists said there were real threats to Britain’s interests from Mr. Trump’s victory in November.

Scientists solve Killer Whales menopause mystery

Scientists solve killer whales’ menopause mystery

Benefits of grandmothering may have played a major role in the success of older female orcas (killer whales) but the costs of being outcompeted by their daughters apparently play a role in the emergence of their menopause, a new study suggested.

According to the study, published in the journal Current Biology, younger females are more likely to mate and reproduce than their older counterparts. They found that this trend puts off mother orcas from reproduction, which in turn make them more focused on raising their younger members of their families instead.

Tags: 

Biologists discover ruby sea dragon in the wild

Biologists discover ruby sea dragon in the wild

Marine biologists had been of the view that only two types of sea dragons existed, the leafy and weedy, until they discovered a third type in 2015. The third type of the enchanting fish, the ruby sea dragon, was first found among museum specimens; and now biologists have spotted a ruby sea dragon swimming in the wild too.

Spotted for the first time in the wild, the ruby sea dragon has deep red color and appears like a stretched-out sea horse and hump like a camel. It can curl its tail.

Tags: 

Experts blame federal government for haziness over marijuana’s myriad health effects

Experts blame federal government for haziness over marijuana’s myriad health effects

More than two dozen states in the U.S. have legalized marijuana and millions of people across the nation use the drug each month, but the precise health effects of the drug on those who use it remain a mystery.

Experts say they have only a hazy idea of the drug’s myriad health effects, and argue that federal laws are to be blamed for the issue. Some experts say that the federal government is erecting major barriers to research that would have provided answers to solve the mystery.

Tags: 

Smoking costs global economy $1 trillion annually: WHO/NCI study

Smoking costs global economy $1 trillion annually: WHO/NCI study

Smoking costs the global economy more than $1 trillion annually and the habit will be claiming as many as 8 million lives each year by 2030, according to a new report by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI).

The newly published report stressed that the cost of smoking far outweighs taxes generated through tobacco sales, which have been estimated at around $269 billion for the year of 2013-2014.

Tags: 

Researchers trace Fast Radio Burst back to its origin

Researchers trace Fast Radio Burst back to its origin

An unprecedented detection of a repeating “Fast Radio Burst (FRB)” has allowed astronomers to identify its origin, prompting scientists to reconsider what they believed they knew about FRBs.

FRBs are tremendously powerful flashes of cosmic light, which can be detected from billions of light-years away. In spite of the ferocity of the bursts, these radio emissions are rarely detected because of they are extremely short-lived.

As FRBs last for just a fraction of a second, they are hard to capture, and their origin is even harder to pinpoint.

Tags: 

Peanuts in baby’s diet can prevent allergy: NIH

Peanuts in baby’s diet can prevent allergy: NIH

Babies who are fed regularly with peanut-containing foods starting around six months of age face lower risk of suffering scary allergy, according to the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) new guidelines.

Issuing new guidelines on Thursday, the NIH issued said that most babies should regularly be fed with peanut-containing foods starting at the age of 6 months, some as early as 4 months.

The new guidelines mark a major shift in dietary advice for kids in a country where peanut-related allergy is one of the most dangerous food allergies.

Tags: 

Researchers find common morning sickness drug ineffective

Researchers find common morning sickness drug ineffective

A pill routinely taken by millions of pregnant women for getting rid of morning sickness may not be as effective as it claims to be, a new research suggested.

The morning sickness drug called pyridoxine-doxylamine, which is sold as Diclegis in the United States and as Diclectin in Canada, has been in use since the 1970s. An older version of the drug has been used since the 1950s.

Study co-author Dr. Navindra Persaud, of St. Michael’s Hospital and Canada’s University, and colleagues reviewed data from a decades-old trial and found little evidence that the drug is effective.

Tags: 

New study casts fresh doubt over global warming ‘pause’

New study casts fresh doubt over global warming ‘pause’

Results of a new analysis of climate data has supported the controversial study that suggested there has been no slowdown in global warming over the first fifteen years of this century.

According to the new analysis report, climate scientists involved in the previous study underestimated ocean temperatures over the last couple of decades, which led them to misunderstand that global warming slowed down between 1998 and 2014.

Tags: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Research