Research

Space physically impacts astronauts’ brains: Study

Space physically impacts astronauts’ brains: study

It has long been known that spending time in space can have detrimental effects on the human body. Now, a new research has revealed that space physically impacts astronauts on multiple levels, including human brain.

The new research, conducted by a team of University of Michigan researchers, suggested that microgravity during spaceflights can affect the human brain in ways that scientists are still struggling to understand.

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Study suggests timing and frequency of meals for healthy weight

Study suggests timing and frequency of meals

A new study conducted by a team of experts from different committees of the American Heart Association has suggested that even timing of eating and how frequently you eat also play a role in maintaining healthy weight and heart.

Led by Associate Prof. Marie-Pierre St-Onge of Columbia University, the researcher suggested that paying attention to how often you eat, and at what time of the day you eat, can play a crucial role in lowering risk of stroke and heart attacks.

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Fat-shaming can boost risk of heart attacks: study

Fat-shaming can boost risk of heart attacks: study

Fat-shaming, in which obese or overweight people are labeled as unattractive, incompetent and lazy and are blamed for their condition, may make them more likely to have a heart attack, a new research warned.

It has long been believed that fat-shaming helps by prompting overweight people to decrease their weight, but a new study by a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania has warned that it could actually increase the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

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LSD study claims to reveal what makes music meaningful

LSD study claims to reveal what makes music meaningful

A new research from Switzerland claims to have explained what makes things we experience, including music, meaningful.

In the small study, a team of researchers asked individuals to take the drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), and then they were able to determine how the participants’ brains ascribed meaning to certain factors, like songs, in their surroundings.

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Strange insect prompts scientists to create new scientific order

Strange insect prompts scientists to create new scientific order

A new scientific order has been created for a recently-discovered insect that lived in a region what is now known as Burma nearly 100 million years ago, alongside dinosaurs.

According to a new study published in the journal Cretaceous Research, the tiny insect with an “alien-like” appearance and unusual features was discovered by Oregon State University (OSU) researchers in amber.

The researchers described the ancient fossilized creature as a small, wingless female insect that lived in fissures in trees’ bark. It might have fed on worms, mites or fungi.

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Researchers discover ‘alien-looking’ insect trapped in amber

Researchers discover ‘alien-looking’ insect trapped in amber

A recently discovered alien-looking fossilized insect is so strange that it not only required to be named as a new species, but also to be placed under a new scientific order, researchers reported.

The alien-looking tiny insect with a strange head and long skinny legs crawled around on trees in a region what is now known as Burma nearly 100 million years ago, in the time of the huge dinosaurs.

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Researchers identify chemical compounds that give tomatoes distinctive taste

Researchers identify chemical compounds that give tomatoes distinctive taste

A team of American researchers claimed to have identified the chemical compounds that give a great tomato its distinctive sweet, earthy taste. They have also pin pointed the genes that code for these chemicals and where these genes can be found in the tomato genome.

University of Florida researchers said their study could help breeders create tomatoes that would be hardy enough to survive the long and demanding journey from fields to kitchens without sacrificing flavor and taste.

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Robotic sleeve physically keeps flabby heart beating during heart failure

Robotic sleeve physically keeps flabby heart beating during heart failure

A team of American scientists have developed a robotic sleeve that might be able to save patients’ lives by physically keeping their heart beating in case of heart failure.

Developed by scientists from Harvard University and Boston Children’s Hospital using artificial muscles, the thin silicone-made robotic sleeve can encase a flabby diseased heart and gently squeeze it to keep it pumping.

The thin silicon sleeve alternately compresses, twists as well as relaxes in synchrony with the heart tissue beneath.

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Larsen C ice crack continues to increase

Larsen C ice crack continues to lengthen

A tabular iceberg one-quarter the size of Wales may soon break off the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica as a crack in it continues to lengthen, climate scientists have warned.

Since January 1, the crack in the Larsen C Ice Shelf has extended further 10 kilometers, and scientists have warned that it would free a massive tabular berg if the rift propagates merely 20 kilometers.

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Acupuncture may reduce colicky crying among babies: study

Acupuncture may reduce colicky crying among babies: study

The ancient Chinese practice of acupuncture may reduce colicky crying among babies when other treatments do not help, a new study suggested.

Crying is normal for babies but those who cry more than three hours a day and continue to do so for more than three days a week might be give a sign that a physician’s intervention is required. Excessive crying is also called infantile colic.

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