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Scientists predict ice-melting temperatures for Arctic

Scientists predict ice-melting temperatures for Arctic

Some parts of the Arctic will likely witness gusts of warm air over the coming days that will be more than 20C hotter than usual, with some tipping over the 0 degree Celsius melting point of ice, climate scientists have predicted.

This is the second consecutive year for which scientists have predicted ice-melting temperatures for some parts of the Arctic in the middle of winter.

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NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite to revolutionize weather forecasting

NOAA’s GOES-16 satellite to revolutionize weather forecasting

The NOAA’s newly launched powerful satellite, called the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R Series (GOES-R), will enable weather scientists to make more precise and accurate forecasts about looming storms, hurricanes, lightning strikes and blizzards.

The GOES-R, which is also called GOES-16, lifted off from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Nov. 19 at 6:42 p.m. EST or 2342 GMT, riding a ULA’s Atlas V rocket.

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Huge whale spotted in Hudson River near G.W. Bridge

Huge whale spotted in Hudson River near G.W. Bridge

A huge humpback whale was spotted in the Hudson River close to the George Washington Bridge on Friday, the Coast Guard as well as the Palisades Interstate Parkway Police confirmed.

The location where the whale was spotted yesterday afternoon marked the farthest north site where a whale has been seen in the river in recent history.

A video captured by Chopper 4 showed the huge marine creature blowing water into the air in the waterway shortly before 2 p.m. Several people saw the video on social media.

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Weather satellite GOES-R to be launched on Saturday

Weather satellite GOES-R to be launched on Saturday

The launch of a weather satellite, called the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R Series (GOES-R,) will take place at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 5:45 p.m. on Saturday, the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) announced.

The space agency announced that the GOES-R system will be launched from Space Launch Complex 41 using an Atlas V 541 rocket. The launch of the satellite was postponed several times in the past because of technical issues.

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Sea ice in Arctic reaches its second-lowest level this summer

Sea ice in Arctic reaches its second-lowest point this summer

After 2012 when the record for lowest level of sea ice floating on the Arctic Ocean was made, this summer Arctic has witnessed its second-lowest level. Experts have been calling the new pattern for ice activity in the Arctic as a new regime.

Mark Serreze, director of the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Colorado said that the new findings are strengthening the statement that the Arctic acts as the early warning system for impacts of climate change.

July 2016 temperature beats all previous record for July: NASA

July 2016 temperature beats all previous record for July: NASA

This year’s global average surface temperature during July was 0.84 degrees Celsius higher, registering the highest temperature deviation from average for the month of July, announced NASA. July 2016 was the hottest month on earth since the time record keeping has started since 1880.

As per NASA’s database, July is the tenth month in a row to be the warmest on record. It is now almost sure that 2016 will surpass 2015 in terms of the hottest year on record. With July 2016 as the hottest month, the past 15 months have set records for temperature.

International report highlights how 2015 surpassed previous climate change record highs

International report highlights how 2015 surpassed previous climate change record highs

A freshly released annual international climate report has unveiled that earth’s temperature is increasing as well as the related symptoms that could be expected with a rising temperature. The State of the Climate report has stated that the health of the planet’s atmosphere has fallen into uncharted territory.

Hexacopter drone helps Hawaii researchers to count whale calves without hindering their privacy

Hexacopter drone helps Hawaii researchers to count whale calves without hindering their privacy

Usage of drones in wildlife research is increasing. Lately, it has been found that the technology is being used by NOAA researchers in the Hawaiian Island so they could count the whale calves without disturbing them.

For the first time this summer, ecologists have used drones to come up with proper lists of the whale and dolphin pods near Hawaii. The drones’ inclusion with the NOAA’s recent whale-expedition is another function of what drones can do. Already, drones presence is on rise in police work, real estate, or even firefighting.

Researchers use drone for first time to photograph whales and dolphins around Hawaiian Islands

Researchers use drone for first time to photograph whales and dolphins around Hawaiian Islands

For the first time, federal researchers have used hexacopter drones in their 30-day expedition to study whales and dolphins around the Hawaiian Islands. Main aim behind conducting the study was to find signs as to how dolphins and whales can maintain healthy populations in the region.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists said that it is also the first time that drones have been used to estimate group sizes of whales. It is not easy to gather data on the animals, especially in the windward coasts of the Hawaiian Islands.

Nautilus team starts assessing strange purple ball found by it off California Coast

Nautilus team starts assessing strange purple ball found by it off California Coast

This week, Ocean Exploration Trust's vessel, Nautilus, has spotted a strange purple blob in the Pacific Ocean off California’s southern coast. For now, it has not been confirmed what exactly it is. It could be an earlier unknown type of egg sac or a new species.

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