Plants

Mass bleaching events offer low prospect of recovery for Great Barrier Reef

Mass bleaching events offer zero prospect of recovery for Great Barrier Reef

Mass bleaching events occurred just twelve months apart offer zero prospect of recovery for the Great Barrier Reef in north Queensland, scientists have warned.

The Great Barrier Reef suffered two consecutive massive coral bleaching events, in 2016 and 2017. A team of scientists from the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies conducted aerial surveys of the structure, and found that the bleaching events damaged a 1,500km stretch of the reef.

Cyclone Debbie impacts Great Barrier Reef: Report

Cyclone Debbie makes devastating blow to Great Barrier Reef

After suffering back-to-back severe coral bleaching, the Great Barrier Reef has had to cope with another devastating blow — Cyclone Debbie. Ferocious winds moving at speeds of up to 260 kilometer per hour tore through the Whitsunday Islands and made landfall at Airlie Beach. Local researchers and reporters went underwater to examine the destruction caused by the cyclone.

The cyclone snapped off branches and lifted up and threw aside massive pieces of coral. Local tour operators portrayed a disheartening picture of the broken reef.

Coral bleaching affected two-thirds of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef: Study

Coral bleaching affected two-thirds of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef: scientists say

New aerial surveys have confirmed that back-to-back coral bleaching events have affected more than two-thirds of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.

A team of scientists with the Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at the Australian Research Council conducted the surveys, and scored bleaching at 800 individual coral reefs across 8,000 kilometers at the world’s biggest living structure.

The results proved that two mass bleaching events that took placed in the recent years have affected a 1,500-kilometer stretch, leaving merely the southern part of the reef unscathed.

Debate over Great Barrier Reef’s decline continues

Debate over Great Barrier Reef’s death continues

Earlier this month, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) of Australia warned that numerous species in the popular reef would struggle to fully recover as it is experiencing an unprecedented mass coral bleaching for the second year in a row.

Most scientists believe that reefs across the globe, including Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, are dying due to global warming.

However, some coral reef experts and Republicans in particular argue that there is no strong evidence showing that manmade global warming is responsible for reef damages.

Scientists struggling to prevent total wipeout of crucial coral reefs

Scientists struggling to prevent total wipeout of crucial coral reefs

Following a recent aerial survey of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, scientists are trying to find new ways to prevent a possible total wipeout of the coral reefs.

The aerial survey showed that the Great Barrier Reef is experiencing widespread coral bleaching for the second year in a row, indicating that water temperatures remained too warm to allow corals to recover from last year’s bleaching.

Scientists warned that several coral species are now more susceptible to bleaching after more than twelve months of continued above-average ocean temperatures.

Potatoes Can Grow on Mars: CubeSat Indicator Experiment

Potatoes Can Grow on Mars: CubeSat Indicator Experiment

Colonization of Mars in future is an ambitious project for NASA, ESA, other space agencies but the project presents many challenges for scientists. CubeSat indicator experiment has shown that growing potatoes on Mars will be possible. Planet Mars presents extreme weather conditions and growing crops on the Red Planet will be essential for long term survival. Researchers at International Potato Center planned to grow potatoes under Mars-like conditions. In their initial research project, researchers have reported encouraging results.

Indigenous people had intense impact on Amazon rainforests: Study

Indigenous people had intense impact on Amazon rainforests: Study

Amazon’s ancient indigenous people had a far more intense impact on the composition of the vast local rainforests than formerly known, a new study has suggested.

The new research suggested that several tree species in the Amazon region are abundant because they were cultivated by indigenous people who populated the region before Europeans’ arrival more than 500 years ago.

These tree species include the Brazil nut, acai palm, cacao, caimito and tucuma palm, rubber and cashew.

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Researchers identify chemical compounds that give tomatoes distinctive taste

Researchers identify chemical compounds that give tomatoes distinctive taste

A team of American researchers claimed to have identified the chemical compounds that give a great tomato its distinctive sweet, earthy taste. They have also pin pointed the genes that code for these chemicals and where these genes can be found in the tomato genome.

University of Florida researchers said their study could help breeders create tomatoes that would be hardy enough to survive the long and demanding journey from fields to kitchens without sacrificing flavor and taste.

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Blue Leaves of Begonia Help it Survive in Lower Forest Regions with Low Light

Blue Leaves of Begonia Help it Survive in Lower Forest Regions with Low Light

Blue Leaves of Peacock Begonia (or Begonia pavonina) help the plant to get additional light and survive in darker regions of the forest. The leaves of the plant with iridescent azure helps it adapt with lower level of sunlight in thick rain forests in Southeast Asia. The research paper published in journal Nature Plants informed that like chloroplasts, these structures provide the cellular machinery for photosynthesis.

Wilderness area twice the size of Alaska lost in last 20 years: Study

Wilderness area twice the size of Alaska lost in last 20 years: Study

An alarming revelation has been made in a research paper that since the 1990s around a tenth of earth’s wilderness has been lost. Human activity and disturbance have been reducing these natural spots on an annual basis and this will impact habitat of many wild species.

Scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society have reached the conclusion after assessing satellite and survey data dating back to the 1990s. From the assessment, the researchers have come to know that across the globe, area twice the size of Alaska has been lost in the last two decades.

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