Health

Trump’s Physician Brings Merck's Hair Loss Drug Propecia in Limelight

Trump’s Physician Brings Merck's Hair Loss Drug Propecia in Limelight

President Donald Trump’s hair have been discussed many times and even on his show, Jimmy Fallon checked if they are real or not. President Trump’s physician Dr. Harold Bornstein has started another debate on usage of Propecia and its side effects after he shared with The New York Times that President is using hair loss drug (finasteride). The drug has been popular for past many years for male pattern baldness. Drug manufactures Merck has also faced lawsuits regarding side effects of the drug.

As Opioid Overdose Cases Rise, Drug Company Kaleo Aims at Making Quick Money

As Opioid Overdose Cases Rise, Drug Company Kaleo Aims at Making Quick Money

Opioid overdose cases have been rising and health experts have alarmed about the overdose issues. However, Virginia-based pharmaceutical company making auto-injectable version of naloxone is trying to make quick bucks in this situation. Virginia-based Kaleo has increased the price of its auto-injectable from $690 to $4,500. Naloxone was first released in 1971 as an antidote to opioid overdose. However, the quantity of Naloxone to given to the patient is important. The drug delivery injector plays an important role.

W.H.O. calls for early diagnosis of cancer

W.H.O. calls for early diagnosis of cancer

The World Health Organization (W. H. O.) on Friday released a new guidance to better enhance the chances of survival for cancer patient by making sure that health providers focus on early diagnosis and treatment of the deadly disease.

The health arm of the United Nations (U. N.) released the new guideline just a day ahead of the World Cancer Day, which falls on Feb. 4th every year.

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Hiking & camping can reset your body clock: researchers say

Hiking & camping can reset your body clock: researchers say

A new study conducted by a team of UC Boulder researchers has suggested that hiking and camping for a couple of days can reset a person’s circadian clock and help him/her get more sleep.

The circadian clock is the body’s internal clock that tells a person when it is time to go to bed and when to wake up. This clock is measured by the amount of melatonin that circulates in the blood of a person at any given time.

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Hawaii tops list of Happiest States for the Sixth Time

Hawaii tops list of happiest states for the 6th time

Hawaii once again topped the list of happiest states in the United States, while West Virginia lingered at the bottom, according to Gallup-Healthways’ annual survey of well-being.

The Gallup-Healthways’ annual survey of well-being for the year of 2016 placed Hawaii at the top with a score of 65.2 out of 100. It is the sixth time that Hawaii has grabbed the top place in the poll, a feat that no other state of the nation has accomplished.

Fourth Obamacare open-enrollment period ends

Fourth Obamacare open-enrollment period ends

Amid uncertainty over the future of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which is commonly known as Obamacare, the fourth open-enrollment period closed at midnight Tuesday.

It is still uncertain how much the Trump administration’s actions to undercut the law had affected the number of people signing up for health insurance plans under ACA; but it is certain that fewer people purchased new plans.

Study suggests timing and frequency of meals for healthy weight

Study suggests timing and frequency of meals

A new study conducted by a team of experts from different committees of the American Heart Association has suggested that even timing of eating and how frequently you eat also play a role in maintaining healthy weight and heart.

Led by Associate Prof. Marie-Pierre St-Onge of Columbia University, the researcher suggested that paying attention to how often you eat, and at what time of the day you eat, can play a crucial role in lowering risk of stroke and heart attacks.

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Fat-shaming can boost risk of heart attacks: study

Fat-shaming can boost risk of heart attacks: study

Fat-shaming, in which obese or overweight people are labeled as unattractive, incompetent and lazy and are blamed for their condition, may make them more likely to have a heart attack, a new research warned.

It has long been believed that fat-shaming helps by prompting overweight people to decrease their weight, but a new study by a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania has warned that it could actually increase the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

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Fat Shaming Leads to Negative Impact on Health: Pennsylvania University Study

Fat Shaming Leads to Negative Impact on Health: Pennsylvania University Study

Fat shaming is quite popular and many people feel that shaming someone for extra weight will motivate them to shed those extra kilos. However, a study conducted by Pennsylvania University researchers has found that fat shaming can have a negative impact and it can even raise the risk of heart attack among people who suffer fat shaming over time. The study team found that many people are pushed towards comfort eating due to fat shaming. Many parents press their children with the aim to motivate them but it can have a negative impact in many cases.

University of Florida Scientists Working on Improving Taste of Tomatoes

University of Florida Scientists Working on Improving Taste of Tomatoes

With modification of varieties over decades, tomatoes have lost their original taste, smell and flavor. Many people complain about missing the real flavor and taste among tomatoes usually sold in grocery stores and big chains. Most of the tomato varieties commercially grown miss on taste. While scientists have been working on improving trait like shelf life, firmness and disease resistance, the missed out on the unique flavor of earlier varieties of tomato. University of Florida scientists have identified chemical compounds that offer tomato its distinctive sweet, earthy, slightly grassy.

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