Health

Low vitamin D levels linked to higher MS risk

Low vitamin D levels linked to higher MS risk

Deficiency of vitamin D puts a woman at a significantly higher long-term risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) than those who get enough, according to a new research.

In a case-control study, an increase in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was found to reduce the risk of MS by 39 per cent, after adjusting for sample year, number of pregnancies and births, and the matching factors.

Artificial sweeteners could raise risk of developing type-2 diabetes: Research

Artificial sweeteners could raise risk of developing type-2 diabetes: Research

Consumption of artificial sweeteners in large amounts could significantly raise the risk of developing type-2 diabetes (T2DM), a new research revealed. A team of researchers examined 27 healthy volunteers who were given a quantity of two different NAS (sucralose and acesulfame-K) equivalent to drinking 1.5L of diet beverage daily or an inactive placebo.

The volunteers were asked to consume in the form of capsules thrice a day before meals over a period of two weeks. At the end of the two weeks, the researchers examined the subjects again.

Harmful particles in tattoo ink travels to lymph nodes: Study

Harmful particles in tattoo ink travels to lymph nodes: Study

A large number of people around the globe love to get tattoos on various parts of their body and in varying sizes. But one should be careful as a new study has warned that this particular form of body art could cause health issues.

A team of researchers from Germany and France examined data collected by the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) to study how ink used in tattoos travels inside the body.

PSA screening saves lives with early detection of prostate cancer: Study

PSA screening saves lives with early detection of prostate cancer: Study

Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening significantly reduces the risk for death from deadly disease of prostate cancer as detection at early stage improves outcomes for patients, a new study claimed.

After disparities in settings and implementation were accounted for, two prostate cancer screening trials provide strong evidence that screening really decreases prostate cancer mortality rates.

Researchers develop camera capable of seeing through human body

Researchers develop camera capable of seeing through human body

A team of experts from Proteus EPSRC interdisciplinary research collaboration claimed to have developed a prototype camera capable of seeing through the human body. The camera that can see through the human body using light has been designed to help physicians track medical tools called endoscopes, which are commonly used to examine patients’ internal conditions.

Previously, it was not possible for doctors to track where an endoscope is located in the patient’s body. Sometimes they need to know such tools’ location to guide it to the right place.

Going gluten-free could be damaging for many in long term: Study

Going gluten-free could be damaging for many in long term: Study

Many individuals opting to go gluten-free could actually be doing themselves more harm than good, a new study has warned. Highlighting a Spanish study that found merely 16 per cent of people who self-reported gluten sensitivity really showed the symptoms in a proper trial; the new study warned that opting to go gluten-free might bring unnecessary risks if the person does not have celiac disease.

Research tells us why yawning is so contagious

Research tells us why yawning is so contagious

The human tendency for contagious yawning is triggered automatically by primitive reflexes in an area of the brain that is responsible for motor function, a new study revealed. It is commonly experienced that a person automatically yawns if someone nearby yawns. Now, a team of experts at the University of Nottingham claimed to have solved the mystery.

They found that the human intensity for contagious yawning is triggered involuntarily by an area of the brain called primitive reflexes in the primary motor cortex.

U.S. obesity rates finally leveling off: Report

U.S. obesity rates finally leveling off: Report

A new report released by nonprofits Trust for America’s Health and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has indicated that obesity rates in the United States are finally leveling off.

According to the report, obesity rates among adults remained stable in 45 states between 2015 and 2016. Merely four states, viz. Colorado, Washington, Minnesota and West Virginia, reported increases in obesity rates.

Kansas reported a notable decrease in obesity rates among its residents during the same period.

Slow walkers are twice at risk of heart-related death: Study

Slow walkers are twice at risk of heart-related death: Study

Middle-aged healthy slow walkers face a significantly higher risk of dying due to heart disease than those who walk at a brisk pace, a new study revealed.

A team of researchers at the University of Leicester followed more than 420,000 individuals over a period of 6 years to assess death rates. They were surprised to find that slow walkers were 1.8 to 2.4 times more prone to die of heart disease.

Professor Tom Yates, who led the study, said that people’s walking pace could be a strong indicator of overall health and fitness.

Carbs, not fats, are bad for your health: Research

Carbs, not fats, are bad for your health: Research

A large study could prompt nutritionists to rethink and alter their views on current nutritional standards as it suggests that carbs, not fats, are bad for health.

A team of researchers led by Mahshid Dehghan of the McMaster University’s Population Health Research Institute found that it is not the fat in your diet that increases the risk of premature death; rather too many carbohydrates, particularly the refined, processed type of carbs, might be the real killer.

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