Health

Sugar is worse for blood pressure compared to salt: Study

Sugar is worse for blood pressure compared to salt: Study

A recent study has shaken the common notion of people by revealing that sugar consumption may be considerably worse for blood pressure than salt intake.

Now, since we all know that sugar have many factors on heart diseases and eye problems. Salt is considered to increase blood pressure and sugar is linked with diabetes and obesity.

However, authors of a new study in Open Heart argue sugar can be more effective to give trouble than salt. Sugar, in high amounts, poses negative effects on the body, and in particular, on one's metabolic profile.

Google provides Genome Sequencing Service on its Cloud Platform

Google provides Genome Sequencing Service on its Cloud Platform

Autism Speaks, autism advocacy group, said it was collaborating with Google for sequencing of the genomes of 10,000 people on the autism spectrum together with their family members.

"We believe that the clues to understanding autism lie in that genome. We'd like to leverage the same kind of technology and approach to searching the internet every day to search into the genome for these missing answers", said Rob Ring, Autism Speaks' chief science officer.

Smoking associated with Loss of Y Chromosome

Smoking associated with Loss of Y Chromosome

According to a new study, there is a link between smoking and loss of the Y chromosome in blood cells that leads to increased risk of developing cancer in males.

It is evident that smoking is a main risk factor, which could lead to cancer. According to lead researcher Prof. Jan Dumanski, of Uppsala University in Sweden, males have the Y chromosome, which could somewhat explain why men usually have a shorter life span than women, and why smoking is more risky for men.

Going to bed early makes people worry less: study

Going to bed early makes people worry less: study

Going to bed early and taking sufficient sleep can keep people at an arm's length from negative thoughts and worry, a new study by U. S. Binghamton University researchers suggested.

Researchers Jacob Nota and Meredith Coles analyzed people and reached the conclusion. The team asked 100 volunteers to complete some questionnaires and finish two computerized tasks in order to measure their repetitive negative thinking (RNT). The volunteers were also asked to answer questions regarding their sleep habits and schedules.

Alan Alda dares scientists to elucidate sleep to children

Alan Alda dares scientists to elucidate sleep to children

An easy question has been asked in a contest run by Stony Brook University's Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science. Alan Alda is actor-turned-part-time professor. He is famous for his role in the 1970s sitcom 'M.A.S.H.' has had a lasting curiosity in science.

Alda's native place is New York and he teaches at the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University on Long Island. He started the annual 'Flame Challenge' contest in 2011. In the contest scientists are asked to explain complicated concepts in ways a kid can understand.

Double Arm Transplant Receiver Expresses Thanks to Boston Surgeons

Double Arm Transplant Receiver Expresses Thanks to Boston Surgeons

The Brigham & Women's Hospital surgeons have been thanked by a 40-year-old quadruple amputee on Tuesday. The surgeons carried out an unusual dual arm transplant on him last month. He explained the experience of getting the new limbs as strange.

Acid in Vulture's Stomach may Help them Neutralize Some Poisons in Decaying Meat

Acid in Vulture's Stomach may Help them Neutralize Some Poisons in Decaying Meat

According to a new study, the microbial population of the vulture's gut is composed mainly of two bacteria and both of them are poisonous to vertebrates.

"They are really neat birds, once you get all over the gross stuff", said Keith Bildstein, director of conservation science at Hawk Mountain in Kempton, Pa., who was not involved in the study.

Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy may not have Significant Heart-Health Benefits for Older People

Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Therapy may not have Significant Heart-Health Benefits for Older People

According to a new research, there is possibility that daily low-dose aspirin therapy may not provide significant heart-health benefits to older people.

The study involved over 14,000 Japanese people aged 60 to 85 years. Researchers found no major difference in heart-related deaths or non-fatal heart attacks and strokes between people who consumed aspirin and those who didn't.

Researchers rediscover Brain’s Major Pathway after Disappearing from Medical Texts for Decades

Researchers rediscover Brain’s Major Pathway after Disappearing from Medical Texts for Decades

A team of researchers claimed that it has tracked the complex history of a major pathway in the human brain. The neural pathway was not in medical textbooks for many years. According to the team, the tract of white matter, which is a component of the central nervous system, could be helpful in knowing how visual information is processed in human brain. It could also tell how reading skills of children develop.

Kaiser Permanente teams up with Target Corp. to enter Growing Retail Clinic Business

Kaiser Permanente teams up with Target Corp. to enter Growing Retail Clinic Business

Kaiser Permanente has joined hands with retailer Target to enter growing retail clinics business. It opened three clinics in Target's stores in Southern California on Monday, with two of them in San Diego County, one in Mission Valley and the other in Vista. One more clinic is slated to open in Fullerton next month.

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