Geology

Mount Everest’s Glacial Landscape may be entirely different by Century-end

Mount Everest’s Glacial Landscape may be entirely different by Century-end

Researchers from the European Geosciences Union raised series concerns by unveiling that the Mount Everest's glaciers will melt significantly due to climate change by the century's end.

As per the researchers, between 70 and 99% of the glaciers around Mount Everest could melt by 2100. Joseph Shea from the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development affirmed that glaciers in the region are quite sensitive with regard to any changes in temperature.

Offshore Faults Need More Study, Suggest Earthquake Experts

Offshore Faults Need More Study, Suggest Earthquake Experts

A recent study clarifies the doubts about the tsunami hazard posed by a less-understood jumble of seafloor faults off the coast of Southern California and due to hype created by the big-budget disaster movie 'San Andreas'.

Lead author of the study geologist Mark Legg said that a real-life offshore earthquake and tsunami would not be same as depicted in the Hollywood's script for a washout of Los Angeles or San Diego. Whereas, he said the hazard needs to be given far more attention than it has so far received.

Antarctica’s ‘Stable Region’ Under Threat of Ice Loss

The dangers of global warming yet again manifest themselves as NASA announces that one of the Antarctica’s largest floating ice shelves will disintegrate completely by the end of the decade.

A team of British scientists from the University of Bristol, UK have observed a sudden increase of ice loss in a previously stable region of Antarctica. They have discovered that this 67,000-square mile section of the Antarctica Peninsula which researchers had previously thought was stable is in fact disappearing rapidly into the ocean since 2009.

Larsen C Ice Shelf could Break Up within a Century

Larsen C Ice Shelf could Break Up within a Century

On Wednesday, scientists warned that the largest ice shelf in the Antarctic peninsula, Larsen C, could be lost within a century. The Cryosphere-published study was based on the data from satellite measurements and eight radar surveys taken over 15 years, from 1998 to 2012.

Due to warmer seas and air, the Larsen C ice shelf is melting and within a century it could break up. After going through the data, the researchers came to know the Larsen C has lost on an average of four metres of ice.

Microbes discovered in deep Atlantic Ocean could reveal more about evolution of Complex Life Forms

Microbes discovered in deep Atlantic Ocean could reveal more about evolution of Complex Life Forms

A group of biologists conducted a research project in the deep regions of the Atlantic Ocean and found a group of microbes with very basic life forms. The research team believes that their discovery could provide new clues to how life transformed from simple to complex.

Thijs Ettema, a biologist at Uppsala University in Sweden, was of the view that there is evidence that life soon appeared after earth formed, around 4.5 billion years ago, but at that time the planet was not very hospitable.

Central Oregon Lake Slowly Disappearing

Central Oregon Lake Slowly Disappearing

It has been reported that a central Oregon lake is slowly disappearing and is going down in the drain. Experts said the water body aptly named 'Lost Lake' in Oregon gets filled up every winter and then drains like a bath tub as a 6ft-wide hole opens up. This natural phenomenon causes Lost Lake to turn into a meadow in summers, they said.

Jude McHugh, a spokeswoman for the Willamette National Forest said Lost Lake's water tumbles down the tube and refills the underground water supply that fills the springs in other areas of the forest.

Mysterious lake in Oregon disappears in winter

Mysterious lake in Oregon disappears in winter

A disappearing lake in Oregon's Mount Hood National Forest is a mystery to scientists.

The 'Lost Lake' is located in the Mount Hood National Forest in the central part of the Pacific coast state. It has a hole through which it slowly drains each spring.

The lake fills up with water from melting snow every winter and every spring, the filled water vanishes down two cavernous holes and leaves behind a grassy meadow.

Hydrothermal Vents could be location where Life Began on Earth

Hydrothermal Vents could be location where Life Began on Earth

Underwater volcanoes help form hydrothermal vents, which are formed due to converging plate boundaries. The vents are vital, as they hold biological molecules similar to enzymes and may suggest that they might hold life within them.

Three decades back in 1977, hydrothermal vents were first discovered near the Galapagos Islands. Not only the vents were found, a massive number of earlier unseen organisms were also discovered.

Saltwater Network 1,000 feet below Ice-Free Region in Antarctica

Saltwater Network 1,000 feet below Ice-Free Region in Antarctica

Scientists have uncovered a saltwater network 1,000 feet below an ice-free region McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica. Some parts of the Antarctic region are quite similar to planet Mars and scientists recently discovered tunnels at Mars.

Researchers involved in the study said that the findings are important as the saltwater exists in a temperature that could support microbial life. For the research, electromagnetic sensor was used to find Antarctica's saltwater brines.

Chile's Villarrica Volcano erupts early Tuesday Morning, Thousands Evacuated

Chile's Villarrica Volcano erupts early Tuesday Morning, Thousands Evacuated

A massive eruption was noticed in Villarrica in Chile, sending lava hundreds of meters over the volcano’s summit crater, early Tuesday morning. Ash spread to the neighboring region shortly after the eruption. The intensity of the eruption was so great that the accompanying lava flow melted snow on the slopes of the volcano, leading to creation of some small volcanic mudflows and debris flows.

The eruption caused evacuation of nearly 3,500 people from the small towns around Villarrica, including the vacation town of Pucón.

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