Geology

Geophysicists give possibility of Pavlof Volcanic eruption for second time this year

Geophysicists give possibility of Pavlof Volcanic eruption for second time this year

Scientists at the Alaska Volcano Observatory claimed that Alaskan volcano is all set to blow again after March 27 eruption when it released a volcanic ash cloud 37,000 feet into the air. The ash was so thick that it covered tiny coastal village of Nelson Lagoon.

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Research: 2.7 billion years ago, Earth's air weighed less than half what it does today

Research: 2.7 billion years ago, Earth's air weighed less than half what it does today

As per new research appeared on Monday in the journal Nature Geoscience, around 2.7 billion years back, the air of Earth weighed less than half what it does presently. If confirmed, this finding would prompt a shift from the main perspective that ancient atmosphere was double as thick as today's, which therefore can possibly alter the answer to a very old scientific mystery called the ‘faint young sun paradox’.

That time, our sun was nearly 20% dimmer as compared to it is now, which means the rays of the sun wouldn’t have warmed the surface of Earth as readily.

Half of UNESCO World Heritage sites in danger Due to human activity

Half of UNESCO World Heritage sites in danger Due to human activity

According to a report commissioned by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), half of the UNESCO World Heritage sites around the world are in danger due to human activities, predominately industrial development over exploitation of resources that include mining and logging. The WWF asks companies to leave such sites untouched for their safety and sustenance.

AVO upgrades status of Pavlof Volcano

On Sunday, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) gave the Pavlof Volcano an upgraded status after a pilot reported an ash cloud 20,000 feet high in the area.

AVO has altered the aviation color code to red in the region, issuing the volcano warning. Furthermore, in the area, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has also released a Sigmet for pilots.

As per AVO, seismic activity was first recorded slightly prior to 4 pm and by 4:18 pm. The ash cloud has already been being pushed north. The eruption also resulted into tremors on the ground.

Study anticipates disappearance of ice from Juneau Ice Field by 2099

This week’s study published in the Journal Glaciology anticipates a disappearance of ice in the Juneau Ice Field, Alaska by the end of this century. The loss to ice will continue with rise in global temperature and this would eventually turn the area devoid of ice by 2099. The Juneau Ice Field is a popular tourist attraction, which lured 450,000 tourists to a US Forest Service center last year.

Current rate of carbon release has surpassed PETM-level: Study

Current rate of carbon release has surpassed PETM-level: Study

Current carbon release in the atmosphere is taking place at such a fast rate than it has even surpassed the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, PETM, which took place around 56 million years ago. The period is known to take sudden-caused concentration of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, hence the global temperature increased by at least 5 degrees Celsius.

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Newly discovered Alaskan butterfly species may help identify alarming changes in arctic ecosystem

Researchers have found a new butterfly species which they believe is the only kind of butterfly endemic to Alaska. The butterfly, called the Tanana arctic, was misidentified for over six decades, as per the researchers.  The butterfly species could be spotted in Tanana-Yukon River Basin region. Researchers think the butterfly could change their opinion on global warming as it responds very quickly to climate change. The new Alaskan butterfly species may help study changes in the arctic ecosystem, said Andre

Researchers have found a new butterfly species which they believe is the only kind of butterfly endemic to Alaska. The butterfly, called the Tanana arctic, was misidentified for over six decades, as per the researchers.

Seismologist Lucy Jones retiring from US Geological Survey

Seismologist Lucy Jones retiring from US Geological Survey

Seismologist Lucy Jones, who was the face of earthquake science and safety in Southern California for a long time, will shortly retire from the US Geological Survey.

On Friday, in a Twitter post, Jones shared that though she is leaving federal service but will stay there at the California Institute of Technology, where she is serving as a research associate.

Since long, it was Jones to whom the public looked up to at the time of earth shakes. She was always there in front of news cameras at the Caltech seismology lab, explaining magnitudes, errors and other information.

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Guantánamo Bay Naval Base could be transformed into marine conservation area and international peace park

Guantánamo Bay Naval Base could be transformed into marine conservation area and international peace park

As part of a new proposal, Guantánamo Bay Naval Base, which includes the well known detention center, could be changed into a marine conservation area and an international peace park, once the inmates vacant it.

Appeared in the journal Science on Thursday, the proposal indicates that the fate of the base could depend on the decision taken by authorities. The relations between Cuba and the United States have improved recently. President Obama’s will soon make a historic visit to Cuba.

What could have led to an end of Civilization on Eastern Island

What could have led to an end of Civilization on Eastern Island

The Rapa Nui Island, famous for its homogenous stone statue called Moai, was named Eastern Island during its discovery by a Dutch explorer Jacob Roggeveen in 1722. Once it was home to civilization of monolithic era that later became extinct. Many archeologists have different views regarding what led to the demise of Rapa Nui. Two possible answers to the question by historians and archeologists are in conflict with each other.

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