Disaster

First Asteroid of the Year Smashes into Earth’s Atmosphere over the Atlantic Ocean on January 2, 2014

First Asteroid of the Year Smashes into Earth’s Atmosphere over the Atlantic Ocean on January 2, 2014

On January 2, 2014 around 2 p.m. EST, the first asteroid of the year shattered in the atmosphere of the Earth. The asteroid fizzled out at some place over the Atlantic Ocean. The space rock was first seen on New Year.

Astronomers first noticed the asteroid with the help of the Mt. Lemmon survey telescope that is placed on a mountaintop in Arizona. The asteroid is appropriately classified as 2014 AA. The primary pale picture of the asteroid was captured on January 1 around 1:20 a.m. EST.

Chang’e-3 Debris Hit Two Houses in China

Chang’e-3 Debris Hit Two Houses in China

China has launched its first spacecraft to space from the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre in the southwestern province of Sichuan on Monday, i.e. Chang'e-3 lunar. But, a new report states that two houses in China have been damaged by falling debris at the time of its launch.

The Chinese spacecraft company is requesting an insurance company to pay for the damages to the families from the country's ambitious space program. There seems to be no loss to the property and the life because of the fall off debris from the spacecraft.

Fishing Industry and Aquatic Life facing Threat of Ocean Warming

Fishing Industry and Aquatic Life facing Threat of Ocean Warming

Global warming is considered as curse on society. It has been an issue from past many years across nations of the world. Global warming is also held responsible for the cause of change in climatic conditions. Global warming not only affects trees, forests and human life, but also poses great threat to marine and aquatic life.

According to a new report, researchers at University of James Cook in Australia said that ocean warming may make life of fish lethargic. Along with this, fishing industry has also suffered a lot with an increase in level of ocean warming.

Climate change likelier to affect dominant coral population

Climate change likelier to affect dominant coral population

Scientists have said that the predominant easily available corals that are found in large amounts are highly influenced by worldwide changes in atmosphere and sea science basically influence.

They confirmed that throughout periods invaluable to coral development, characteristic choice supports corals with qualities that make them more defenseless to environmental change.

500-Year-Old Clam Accidentally Killed by Scientists

500-Year-Old Clam Accidentally Killed by Scientists

It has been revealed that a 500-year-old clam was killed mistakenly by scientists after it was taken by them for additional research. It happened after a field trip that was conducted by the School of Ocean Sciences in 2006, which helped scientists figure out the age of the clam.

The research was part of a project to gain insight into climate changes over the last 1,000 years. According to reports of USA Today, the creature was alive until the day researchers cracked its shell open for research purposes. But the clam was found dead after that.

Change in Forest Patterns Mapped by Google Earth

Change in Forest Patterns Mapped by Google Earth

According to a latest report, the forests are being studied with the help of a new high-resolution global map. This map can trace the findings related to the forest loss and gains and has been created with the help of Google Earth.

Sources have revealed that this interactive online tool is publically available. Also it can zoom its lenses to an extraordinarily high level of local detail or to a resolution of about 30m.

Amazon Deforestation Could Cause Shortage of Food and Water in US

Amazon Deforestation Could Cause Shortage of Food and Water in US

The gradual advancement in the field of science and technologies, new plants and industries has contributed a lot in the field of global warming. Global warming is also held responsible for change in climatic conditions and deforestation.

According to a climate simulation research lead by Princeton University, deforestation in Amazon forests could lead to shortage of food and water resources. It may also lead to significant reduction in the rain and snowfall in the areas of western United States.

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