Climate

Arctic sea ice melting at alarming rates is a new normal

Arctic sea ice melting at alarming rates is a new normal

Melting of the Arctic sea ice, which started at an alarming pace and then the melt slowed down by June, has now led NASA scientists to affirm that they should consider this kind of melt as the new normal.

Walt Meier, a sea ice specialist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, was of the view that if this incident would have taken place a decade back then it would have surely set a new record low. But now, Meier said that they are quite used to these low levels of sea ice, in fact a new normal.

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Free-to-use interactive game to communicate climate change impact on Antarctic Ice Sheet

Free-to-use interactive game to communicate climate change impact on Antarctic Ice Sheet

A new and interesting way has been found to pass on the impact of climate change on the Antarctic Ice Sheet. For it, scientists and game developers have joined hands to produce a free-to-use interactive game ‘Ice Flows’ to demonstrate how the Antarctic Ice Sheet reacts to climate change.

Through this manner, people of all age groups across the world will come to know about the impact of a changing climate on the world’s ice sheets. The game will be launched on 23 August at the SCAR (Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research) Open Science Conference in Kuala Lumpur.

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Adonis: Pine tree aged at least 1,075 years old is oldest in Europe

Adonis: Pine tree aged at least 1,075 years old is oldest in Europe

A pine tree in Greece considered to be at least 1,075 years old has been termed as the oldest tree in Europe. The pine tree nicknamed ‘Adonis’ is a Bosnian pine growing in the highlands of northern Greece. It is quite unique because it does not rely on a mother plant or the ability to split or clone itself, to survive.

There are many trees in Europe that are much older like some of them have lived for nearly 10,000 years. But there is a difference and that is those trees are clonal meaning that they reproduce asexually time and again throughout history.

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Fish pee helpful in maintaining healthy coral

Fish pee helpful in maintaining healthy coral

A Nature Communications-published study unveiled that fish urine is vital for the health of coral reefs. Coral reefs are dependent on fish for key nutrients as they help corals grow. When fish urinate, they release phosphorus in the water.

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Two-thirds of methane coming from just 25 locations out of over 250 newfound sources of methane hot spots

Two-thirds of methane coming from just 25 locations out of over 250 newfound sources of methane hot spots

Over 250 sources of a methane hot spot have been discovered by researchers over the Four Corners region of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah. The sources include gas wells, storage tanks, pipelines and processing plants.

It is considered that extra methane is the result of leaks during natural gas production. There were very few sources that were from natural seeps and one was found to be from a coal mine. As much as two-thirds of the ejection was from around 25 locations.

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July 2016 temperature beats all previous record for July: NASA

July 2016 temperature beats all previous record for July: NASA

This year’s global average surface temperature during July was 0.84 degrees Celsius higher, registering the highest temperature deviation from average for the month of July, announced NASA. July 2016 was the hottest month on earth since the time record keeping has started since 1880.

As per NASA’s database, July is the tenth month in a row to be the warmest on record. It is now almost sure that 2016 will surpass 2015 in terms of the hottest year on record. With July 2016 as the hottest month, the past 15 months have set records for temperature.

Steamy weather makes cockroaches more active: Research

Steamy weather making cockroaches more active

As Americans have been feeling above-average heat this summer, with temperatures soaring into the mid-80s; conditions are ripe for the much-maligned pests to get active.

The steamy weather is prompting the domesticated versions of the brown-colored bugs or cockroaches to spread their wings and fly, taking to the air. According to entomologists and bug experts, the combination of heat and humidity is responsible for the situation.

Titan’s canyon system filled with channels of flowing liquid

Titan’s canyon system filled with channels of flowing liquid

NASA announced Wednesday that its Cassini spacecraft has discovered a canyon network full of liquid hydrocarbons on the surface of Saturn’s moon Titan. It is considered to be the first direct evidence of the presence of liquid-filled channels on Titan.

The images assessed by NASA astronomers were captured by Cassini when it had a close flyby in May 2013. During that time, Cassini’s radar instruments have focused on channels that were coming out from Ligeia Mare, a large northern sea on Titan.

Planet Venus could have been once habitable, predicts NASA model

Planet Venus may have been once habitable, predicts NASA model

Considering the present situation on Venus, the idea that it could host life seems to be fear out. But as per the projections of a NASA climate model, the second planet from the sun may have once been habitable.

Once it might have hosted a shallow and liquid-water ocean and a habitable surface. Scientists working at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) have developed the model with an aim to know if the planet did once had conditions akin to those present on earth.

Long-term effects of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings not as severe as considered: Study

Long-term effects of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings not as severe as considered: Study

Assessment of over 60 years of medical research on survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the time of World War II has unveiled that the long-term health effects of the bomb dropping were not as severe as considered earlier.

Study’s lead researcher Bertrand Jordan, a molecular biologist in France, said that as per the data, there were around 177,000 survivors and their children and as a control group, they included 20,000 people who were not exposed to radiation from the bombs.

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