Biology

Scientists discover pollutants 10,000 meters deep in the Pacific Ocean

Scientists discover pollutants 10,000 meters deep in the Pacific Ocean

A new research has revealed the presence of chemical pollutants PCBs and PBDEs in some of the Pacific Ocean’s deepest trenches that were previously thought to be unharmed by human influence.

Scientists were surprised to find PCBs, PBDEs and other chemical pollutants in high concentrations in deep sea ecosystems because these pollutants have been banned since the 1970s.

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Japanese scientists develop robotic pollinator

Japanese scientists develop robotic pollinator

A team of Japanese scientists has successfully turned a small remote-controlled drone into a honey bee-like pollinator by attaching horsehairs layered with a special, sticky gel to its underbelly.

Flowers looking to receive pollen from their male parts into another bloom’s female parts often require an envoy to carry pollen. Those third players, such as honey bees, are called as pollinators.

Fish-scale gecko escapes predators’ grip by shedding scales and skin

Fish-scale gecko escapes predators’ grip by shedding scales and skin

Researchers have discovered a new type of gecko, an evasive little lizard that can escape predators’ grip by shedding its scales as well as skin.

The new species, dubbed Geckolepis megalepis, has the biggest scales of any fish-scale gecko, some of which measure nearly 8 per cent of its total body length. A team of researchers, led by Mark D. Scherz of Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, discovered it northern Madagascar’s limestone karst.

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Viscoelastic Tongue Helps Frogs to Catch Prey Easily: Research

Viscoelastic Tongue Helps Frogs to Catch Prey Easily: Research

Frogs use a viscoelastic tongue and non-Newtonian saliva to catch prey, as per a new research paper from researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology has informed. The research paper has been published in Journal of The Royal Society Interface. Frogs use their whip-like tongue and it hits the prey with a strong force. The tongue is very soft and a unique reversible saliva offers the stickiness to this action, which helps frogs to trap their prey. The swift action and stickiness doesn’t give a chance to the prey to escape. Before the prey knows it, it is already in mouth of the frog.

Frogs use sticky spit to catch prey

Frogs turn to sticky spit to catch prey

Frog’s sticky spit is one of the catchiest spits on the planet, and it is tailor-made to grab bugs, according to a new research on frog saliva.

Led by Alexis Noel, a PhD student at the Georgia Institute of Technology, a team of researchers used high-speed photography as well as an instrument known as Rheometer to analyze saliva collected form 15 frogs under prey-capturing conditions.

Explaining how he collected frog saliva, Noel said he got fifteen frogs, and scraped their tongues for hours. He called it a “pretty disgusting” experience.

Researchers identify chemical compounds that give tomatoes distinctive taste

Researchers identify chemical compounds that give tomatoes distinctive taste

A team of American researchers claimed to have identified the chemical compounds that give a great tomato its distinctive sweet, earthy taste. They have also pin pointed the genes that code for these chemicals and where these genes can be found in the tomato genome.

University of Florida researchers said their study could help breeders create tomatoes that would be hardy enough to survive the long and demanding journey from fields to kitchens without sacrificing flavor and taste.

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Tiny moth named after Donald Trump

Tiny moth named after Donald Trump

A recently discovered tiny moth that has helmet-like cluster of yellow-white scales atop its head has been named after President-elect Donald Trump, the journal ZooKeys reported.

Dr. Vazrick Nazari, an evolutionary biologist from Ottowa, Canada, said the moth with a wingspan of merely 0.4 inches encouraged them to name it Neopalpa donaldtrumpi because it has yellow and white scales on its head resembling Trump’s signature hairstyle.

Scientists solve Killer Whales menopause mystery

Scientists solve killer whales’ menopause mystery

Benefits of grandmothering may have played a major role in the success of older female orcas (killer whales) but the costs of being outcompeted by their daughters apparently play a role in the emergence of their menopause, a new study suggested.

According to the study, published in the journal Current Biology, younger females are more likely to mate and reproduce than their older counterparts. They found that this trend puts off mother orcas from reproduction, which in turn make them more focused on raising their younger members of their families instead.

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Biologists discover ruby sea dragon in the wild

Biologists discover ruby sea dragon in the wild

Marine biologists had been of the view that only two types of sea dragons existed, the leafy and weedy, until they discovered a third type in 2015. The third type of the enchanting fish, the ruby sea dragon, was first found among museum specimens; and now biologists have spotted a ruby sea dragon swimming in the wild too.

Spotted for the first time in the wild, the ruby sea dragon has deep red color and appears like a stretched-out sea horse and hump like a camel. It can curl its tail.

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New ape species named after Star Wars’ Luke Skywalker

New ape species named after Star Wars’ Luke Skywalker

A newly discovered ape species, which lives in eastern parts of Myanmar and southwestern China, has been named after Star Wars’ Luke Skywalker.

The skywalker hoolock gibbon is also called the Gaoligong hoolock gibbon as the species has been found in the area of Mt. Gaoligong on the Myanmar-China border.

The biologists explained that the Jedi ape is apart from his fellow gibbons mainly due to the shape of its eyebrows and the color of its eye rings. They are also genetically different.

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