Animals

Back with a Bang: California sea otter population at its highest since record-keeping started in 1982

Back with a Bang: California sea otter population at its highest since record-keeping started in 1982

California sea otters’ population has reached a record high. A latest survey has unveiled that the population of the ocean ambassadors of Monterey Bay and Big Sur is currently the highest since 1982 when federal and state officials first started maintaining the record.

This year’s sea otters’ population stands at 3,272, which is an 11% rise since 2013. Tim Tinker, a research biologist, who leads the US Geological Survey’s otter program, said that increase in the population of sea urchins, favorite food of the otters, seem to be the reason behind rise in the otters’ population.

Tags: 

Fossil reveals unique camouflage pattern used by Psittacosaurus

Scientists unveil unique camouflage pattern used by Psittacosaurus

Dinosaur fossils discovered in the recent years have offered very interesting information about various species that thrived the planet in the past and Psittacosaurus fossil presents a unique camouflage patterns noticed in any dinosaur species for the first time. Scientists have carried out a detailed assessment of a well-preserved Chinese Psittacosaurus fossil. After the fossil analysis, they have come to know that the dinosaur had a defense mechanism that has been never seen before in any other dinosaur species.

Tags: 

Google’s Global Fishing Watch aims to reduce overfishing and illegal fishing in oceans

Google’sGlobal Fishing Watch aims to reduce overfishing and illegal fishing in oceans

Google’s new satellite-based surveillance system named Global Fishing Watch aims to change current scenario where illegal and unreported fishing has become quite a task to combat. Owing to limited resources, it has become difficult to catch renegade fishermen.

The new satellite-based surveillance system will keep on combing the world from the sky in order to find out those illegally using the oceans. Marine-advocacy group Oceana and West Virginia-based nonprofit SkyTruth were involved with Google in the development of Global Fishing Watch.

Google’s Global Fishing Watch aims to combat overfishing and illegal fishing

Google’s Global Fishing Watch aims to combat overfishing and illegal fishing

Google will unveil its new satellite-based surveillance system that aims to change current situation on illegal fishing. Global Fishing Watch has been designed to keep a constant check to look out for those indulging in this trade.

The system has been made in partnership with Oceana, a marine-advocacy group, and West Virginia-based nonprofit SkyTruth. It would be a completely free platform that would prove useful for governments, journalists and citizens to keep a tab on around 35,000 commercial fishing vessels.

Tags: 

Large animals in modern oceans face greater extinction risk than small ones

Large animals from modern oceans face greater extinction risk than small ones

Lately, scientists have unveiled that big fish and other ocean creatures are more vulnerable to face extinction than small creatures. The revelation has challenged the most common notion.

It has been said so as fossils from five mass extinction events have suggested that small marine animals were at increased risk to become extinct than big ones in the pre-historic cataclysms. But what was found was large modern fish, including tuna and sharks and mammals were increasingly being list on ‘Red List’ of endangered species than smaller ones.

Tags: 

Hawaiian crows use twigs to dig prey out of hard-to-reach spots

Hawaiian crows use twigs to dig prey out of hard-to-reach spots

A journal Nature-published research paper has unveiled that the Hawaiian crow holds twigs in its teeth to take out insects and other prey from difficult to reach places. Study researchers have said that the Hawaiian crow is the only second member of its genus to be known to carry out such tasks.

Study’s lead researcher Christian Rutz from the University of St. Andrews said that the discovery is no less than eureka moment for them. For over a decade, researchers have been studying New Caledonian crows, the first member of the genus known as Corvus known for natural tool use.

Tags: 

Polar bears circling Arctic outpost of Russian scientists

Polar bears circling Arctic outpost of Russian scientists

A team of five Russian researchers shared that their outpost on Troynoy Island is being surrounded by around 10 adult polar bears and their cubs. In this situation, it is not safe for them to leave the outpost.

The researchers said that a female polar bear spends nights outside the station. In fact, the team no more has flares with them and polar bears have also killed one of their dogs. It has become quite difficult for them to perform meteorological observations.

Tags: 

Dolphins’ pattern of communication not so different from the way humans communicate: Study

Dolphins’ pattern of communication not so different from the way humans communicate: Study

For the first time, researchers have recorded a conversation between dolphins. Study researchers noticed the same after recording the conversation between two adult Black Sea bottlenose dolphins, named Yasha and Yana.

The dolphins did not interrupt each other during the conversation and took a pause to listen to each other. Researchers said that the pattern of communication was not different from the way modern humans talk to one another.

Tags: 

Bats waggle head and wiggle ears to keep track on prey with incredible precision

Bats waggle head and wiggle ears to keep track on prey with incredible precision

A PLOS Biology-published research paper has unveiled that bats also do head tilts as it help them track their prey with great level of precision. As per the researchers, bats use the head-tilts to enhance existing sensory awareness.

In the study, Melville Wohlgemuth at the University of Maryland along with team members has used recording devices to keep a tab on three big brown bats. Main focus of the research team was to notice when bats waggled their heads and wiggled their ears.

Humpback whales off the endangered category in the latest review

Humpback whales off the endangered category in the latest review

Endangered since 1970, US humpback whale population has bounced back and is no longer in the list of endangered species, unveiled federal authorities. Out of 14 different populations of humpback whales, nine have been removed from the endangered list of species.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Animals