South Africa

Doctors confirm rare case of HIV remission without drugs

Doctors confirm rare case of HIV remission without drugs

While most people need daily treatment to prevent HIV from destroying the immune system and causing AIDS, a 9-year-old in South Africa has been in HIV remission for years without drugs.

Doctors confirmed that the child, whose name was revealed, was given treatment shortly after birth but the boy has been off drugs for 8½ years without symptoms or signs of active virus.

Images of Deformed Lamb Born in South Africa Go Viral

Images of Deformed Lamb Born in South Africa Go Viral

Images of a deformed lamb born in South Africa have gone viral and local authorities have confirmed that the images circulating on internet are real. Many people have termed the images as a strange creature which looks like ‘half human and half lamb’. However, veterinary experts have confirmed that virus infection could be the reason behind deformed lamb. The lamb has some similarity to human baby and people in local community blamed it on witchcraft. The images were shared by a farmer from Lady Frere in Eastern Province, South Africa.

New HIV vaccine study to enroll thousands of people in South Africa

New HIV vaccine study to enroll thousands of people in South Africa

A new, experimental HIV vaccine is being tested in South Africa as part of an extensive study that aims to enroll thousands of people, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced.

The study called HVTN 702 involves a new version of the only HIV vaccine candidate ever shown to grant some defense against the deadly virus. It aims to enroll more than five thousand men and women in South Africa, where more than one thousand people become infected with the deadly virus every day.

Pulsating Stars missing from Milky Way’s inner disk: Research

Pulsating Stars missing from Milky Way’s inner disk: Research

A latest survey of a specific type of blue star, Cepheids, has unveiled that the inner disk of Milky Way galaxy has been completely missing these young stars. Using a near-infrared Japanese-South African telescope at Sutherland, the study researchers have studied Cepheids, but they hardly found any of them.

Cepheids are known as pulsating stars as they pulsate in brightness in a regular cycle. The cycle’s length is linked to the star’s brightness. By monitoring the star’s luminosity, scientists can know when Cepheids were established.

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Oldest known example of malignant tumor discovered in hominin

Oldest known example of malignant tumor discovered in hominin

Discovery of a foot bone dated to around 1.7 million years ago from the site of Swartkrans having definite evidence of malignant cancer has ensured that the disease dates back in deep prehistory rather than from recent times.

For now, the researchers are not sure to which the foot bone belongs to, but one thing is clear that it is of a hominin. The foot bone was originally excavated between 1960 and 1980 from the Swartkrans cave, a part of a World Heritage Site in South Africa.

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Using specialized calls, humans and honeyguides locate bees’ nests and harvest honey

Using specialized calls, humans and honeyguides locate bees’ nests and harvest honey

In Africa, a rare kind of mutualism and cooperation between humans and wild birds can be seen. A new study has unveiled as to how humans seek help from wax-eating bird species, greater honeyguides, to find the nests of bees and harvest honey.

Though humans are known to domesticate many species, this level of cooperation between humans and greater honeyguides is unique. Ethnobiologist Hussein Isack shared that honeyguides and humans team up to find wild bee nests. Birds get wax and humans get honey, beneficial for the both.

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African tribe and wax-eating birds work together to find wild beehives for mutual benefit

People in Africa and wax-eating birds work together to find wild bees’ nests for mutual benefit

A new research paper presents a rare example of cooperation between humans and free-living animals. With the help of honeyguides, a species of bird, people in Africa are able to find beehives helping them to harvest honey.

Study researchers have found that humans use special calls to seek help from honeyguides and in return the birds recruit suitable human partners. In this amazing collaboration, both the bird and human reap benefits.

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Immediate steps needed to control yellow fever outbreak in Angola and beyond

Immediate steps needed to control yellow fever outbreak in Angola and beyond

The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) has asked to strengthen up the measures to tackle with the yellow fever outbreak in Angola and beyond. The outbreak was detected for the first time in Angola in late December 2015.

Around 2,900 suspected cases have been reported in all 18 provinces with 325 deaths. Dr Fatoumata Nafo-Traoré, Director, IFRC Africa region, said that if immediate actions are not taken then the outbreak could turn into a national outbreak.

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Homo Naledi Used to have Tool-Friendly Hand Anatomy

Homo Naledi Used to have Tool-Friendly Hand Anatomy

After examining the fossil remains of Homo Naledi found in a South African cave, scientists said that they may have been handy with tools and walked much like a person. On studying the well-preserved foot and hand bones they said that they used to have many similar characteristics with our species along with some primitive traits useful for tree climbing.

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‘Multiple Antibiotic-Resistant Typhoid is Here to Stay’, Confirms Study

‘Multiple Antibiotic-Resistant Typhoid is Here to Stay’, Confirms Study

An international study, published on 11 May in Nature Genetics1, has brought to the fore interesting results, which confirm the global presence of antibiotic-resistant strains of typhoid.

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