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Gates Foundations announces $140 million investment in Intarcia for HIV prevention device

Gates Foundations announces $140 million investment in Intarcia for HIV prevention device

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has participated in Series EE funding round of Intarcia for development of HIV prevention device. The Gates Foundation will invest $500 shortly and has announced additional $90 million tied to milestones that Intarcia will achieve in future. Intarcia has raised $206 during the current funding round. The company raised $2015 in September 2015.

Migraines could be Deadly for Women, Raise Risk of Heart Problems: Study

Migraines could be Deadly for Women, Raise Risk of Heart Problems: Study

A new study has suggested that women with migraines are more prone to heart problems than women without migraine. In case of severe or mild migraine, women may have higher risk of problems like heart attack and angina, the study added.

The study results also showed that women who suffer from migraines may have increased risk of early death due to heart problems than women who didn’t get the severe headaches. The details results of the study have been published online in the journal the BMJ.

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Eat More Fruit and Drink Less Alcohol to reduce future Breast Cancer Risk

Attention Girls! Eat More Fruit and Drink Less Alcohol to shun Future Breast Cancer Risk

Fruit can help teenage girls in lowering their risk of developing breast cancer in the future, suggested a new study. Another research into the issue found that chances of the cancer increase with alcohol consumption.

The first study, which focused on benefits of fruit, has linked consumption of fruits like bananas, apples and grapes- to plunge in risk for breast cancer. It suggested that just three servings of these fruit per day may help in dropping chances of the cancer by about 25% by middle age.

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Melanoma skin cancer patients have few moles and no atypical ones: Study

Melanoma skin cancer patients have few moles and no atypical ones: Study

Patients with melanoma skin cancer often have few moles and no abnormal moles, unveils a new study, which has cancelled out commonly believed factors about skin cancer. The research has rejected the long-thought belief that people with many moles may be at increased risk of skin cancer.

A team led by Alan Geller of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston has based the findings on the assessment of the 566 melanoma patients in the study. Out of them, around 66% had zero to 20 moles in total and around 73% had no unusual mole.

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