Research tells us why yawning is so contagious

Research tells us why yawning is so contagious

The human tendency for contagious yawning is triggered automatically by primitive reflexes in an area of the brain that is responsible for motor function, a new study revealed. It is commonly experienced that a person automatically yawns if someone nearby yawns. Now, a team of experts at the University of Nottingham claimed to have solved the mystery.

They found that the human intensity for contagious yawning is triggered involuntarily by an area of the brain called primitive reflexes in the primary motor cortex.

The multidisciplinary study, which was a part of a larger study, was led by Professor Stephen Jackson, an expert of cognitive neuroscience in the School of Psychology of the University of Nottingham.

Sharing findings of the study, he said, “We suggest that these findings may be particularly important in understanding further the association between motor excitability and the occurrence of echophenomena in a wide range of clinical conditions…”

The findings of the new study have been published in the most recent edition of the academic journal Current Biology.

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