Scientists find first evidence for Majorana fermion

Scientists find first evidence for Majorana fermion

In 1937, a brilliant physicist named Ettore Majorana predicted that the fermions class of particles, which includes proton, electron, neutron, neutrino and quark, there should be particles acting as their own antiparticles.

Now a team of scientists at University of California claimed to have found the first evidence for such a Majorana fermion. In a series of lab experiments on exotic materials, the team led by UC-Irvine Associate Prof. Jing Xia and UCLA Prof. Kang Wang followed a plan proposed by Stanford Prof. Shoucheng Zhang, and found the first evidence of the so-called Majorana fermion.

Zhang, a theoretical physicist and the senior author of the research paper, called the discovery one of the most intensive searches in fundamental physics in several decades.

Sharing results of their experiments, Zhang said, “Our team predicted exactly where to find the Majorana fermion and what to look for as its ‘smoking gun’ experimental signature. This discovery concludes one of the most intensive searches in fundamental physics, which spanned exactly 80 years.”

The scientists reported the first evidence of a Majorana fermion in the most recent edition (July 20th) of the journal Science.

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