Fever during pregnancy increases autism risk among kids: Study

Fever during pregnancy increases autism risk among kids: Study

A new study has suggested that when a pregnant woman suffers from any type of fever during pregnancy, the child has higher odds of developing an autism spectrum disorder.

A team of researchers at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health also found in the study that pregnant women who suffer fever particularly in the second trimester are more likely to have a baby with autism.

The researchers reached the conclusion after observing 95,754 Norwegian kids born between 1999 and 2009. In Norway, nearly 15,700 kids were born to mothers who had fevers during their pregnancies and 583 cases of autism were identified in that group.

Dr. Mady Hornig, who led the study, said, “Fever is a response to a wide range of infections, and it is common during pregnancy… The absolute risk is low. The vast majority of women who get an infection with fever, even flu, are not going to end up having a child with autism.”

The researchers reported their alarming findings in the most recent edition of the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

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