Slender faced individuals 25% more likely to be left-handed: Study

Slender faced individuals 25% more likely to be left-handed: Study

A new study by a dentistry researcher from the University of Washington has suggested that people who have a slender lower face are nearly 25 per cent more likely to be left-handed.

The researchers reached the conclusion after analyzing data collected through three surveys comprising a total of 13,536 people across the United States.
Approximately 2,000 years ago a Greek physician had identified slender jaws as a marker for susceptibility of TB, and he supposedly turned out to be right. The new study also confirmed that.

Prof. Philippe Hujoel, who led the study, said, “Twentieth-century studies confirmed his clinical observations, as slender facial features became recognized as one aspect of a slender physique of a TB-susceptible person.”

The research suggested that the hypothesis that genetics that shape facial features also increase the odds for left-handedness. Slender jaws are not a rare facial feature in the United States, where one in every five adolescents has this feature.

Thee researchers detailed the findings of their new study in the journal Laterality: Asymmetries of Body, Brain & Cognition.

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