Nobel Prize for Physics Awarded for research related to superfluids and superconductors

Nobel Prize for Physics Awarded for research related to superfluids and superconductors

The 2016 Noble Prize for Physics has been awarded to David J. Thouless, Duncan Haldane and J. Michael Kosterlitz for their commendable research work related to mathematical insights about exotic phases of matter like superfluids and superconductors. The researchers have been awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics for ‘theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter.’

The Nobel Prize in Physics is awarded by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.

Kosterlitz and Thouless worked on topology – a brand of mathematics that deals with properties of matter that change stepwise and can explain properties in states of superconductivity or suprafluidity.

Between year 1901 and 2016, 110 Nobel Prizes in Physics have been awarded. Two women have been awarded Noble Prize for Physics so far. At age 25, the youngest Physics Laureate ever, Lawrence Bragg, was awarded the 1915 Physics Prize along with his father.

In an official statement, Noble Committee said, ““They demonstrated that superconductivity could occur at low temperatures and also explained the mechanism, phase transition, that makes superconductivity disappear at higher temperatures.”

The estimated prize money $930,000 will be shared by three researchers.

A report published by The Guardian informed, “These topological ideas even give rise naturally to the idea of quantisation itself. You cannot move gradually between two topologically distinct forms – say a bagel and a Swedish pretzel. You have to make a quantum leap. In topological terms, you have to make, or break, a connection.”

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