DNA Analysis of Two Infants Buried 11,500 Years Back in Alaska Throws Light of History of First Americans

DNA Analysis of Two Infants Buried 11,500 Years Back in Alaska Throws Light of History of First Americans

On analyzing the mitochondrial DNA of two infants buried at the campsite nearly 11,500 years ago, researchers at the University of Alaska suggested that early humans travelled up to Alaska and stayed there for a while before moving to America. Till now, it is widely believed that people migrated from Asia to America during the last Ice Age.

According to sources, the infant DNA is the first ancient genetic material discovered around the region of Bering Strait and is among the oldest DNA found in America. Further analysis of the archaeological site, where the fossils of the infants have been discovered, has revealed that early humans visited the same area between 13,200 and 8,000 years. Researchers also found that the two infants belonged to two different lineages of Native Americans found somewhere else in America. The fossils of the two infants, from different mothers, were discovered for the first time in 2011.

In 2007, Researchers at the University of Illinois proposed the ‘Beringian standstill model’, which was based on the migration of first people to Americas. As per the hypothesis of the model, Native Americans descended from people who migrated from Asia to Beringia and then spent up to 10,000 years in Beringia before moving rapidly into the Americas around 15,000 years ago. Researchers at the University of Alaska believe that their findings supports the ‘Beringian standstill model’.

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